Double E Ticket

*
Welcome, Guest
Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  
Recent posts
* CLP REPORT *
by gore range
[Yesterday at 08:23:50 PM]
The Trump Administration
by gore range
[Yesterday at 08:00:30 PM]
Tell us how you hated 8 years of OBAMA and less than 2 years of TRUMP...
by gore range
[October 24, 2018, 10:54:50 PM]
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4   Go Down

Author Topic: The middle east  (Read 15217 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

gore range

  • Self Important Starfish
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3485
Re: The middle east
« Reply #15 on: February 26, 2011, 10:49:29 AM »
....currently reported at $9.60 a gallon :

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/motoring/news/8346035/Motorists-facing-6-a-gallon-at-the-pump-due-to-Libya-crisis.html

....interesting to read that Simon_99 estimates his break even/"jumping point"  where his personal out-of-pocket 'gas-only' driving cost to motor about in his private 40mpg automobile exceeds the cost of his taking public transportation is-



.



.



....at the current exchange rates-




.




.




.




.




..................$53.00 per gallon....


....no doubt jolly ole Simon will be pleased to hear he is paying "....almost the same as we pay..."                                      [/]
Logged

NightmarePatrol

  • Self Important Starfish
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 8514
Re: The middle east
« Reply #16 on: March 04, 2011, 03:25:14 PM »
From Orlando, Florida today. Sure it's by the airport... but still... I hope this isn't a precursor of things to come.

Logged

Zipper

  • Self Important Starfish
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2233
    • WWW
Re: The middle east
« Reply #17 on: March 04, 2011, 04:38:43 PM »
I remember when people were organizing "gass off" days... days when consumers were asked not to purchase gasoline at all. I think that pretty much meant the day before and the day after purchases were pretty high, but I wonder if it had any impact at all on lowering prices a couple of years ago.
Logged
Do the right thing because it's the right thing to do.
Visit http://www.jakesblues.net and http://www.dirtydoglive.com

NightmarePatrol

  • Self Important Starfish
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 8514
Re: The middle east
« Reply #18 on: March 04, 2011, 07:07:30 PM »
The gas off things really don't do much. People would have to go a few weeks without getting any gas. I need about a tank a week for a full sized pickup.
Logged

NightmarePatrol

  • Self Important Starfish
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 8514
Re: The middle east
« Reply #19 on: March 18, 2011, 09:33:37 AM »
I find it interesting that Lybia has now declared a cease fire in response to the UN's decision to establish a no fly zone. Equally as interesting is that the UN actually reached an agreement on this or anything else in such a short period of time.
Logged

Zipper

  • Self Important Starfish
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2233
    • WWW
Re: The middle east
« Reply #20 on: March 18, 2011, 03:27:57 PM »
...Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, while visiting Cairo on Wednesday, pledged 90 million dollars in immediate economic assistance to Egypt... (to help their economy!)....and outlined the Overseas Private Investment Corporation's (OPIC) plan to make available two billion dollars for private sector investment.

http://www.globalissues.org/news/2011/03/17/8929

Logged
Do the right thing because it's the right thing to do.
Visit http://www.jakesblues.net and http://www.dirtydoglive.com

Spicoli

  • Definately Not Leaving
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 160
Re: The middle east
« Reply #21 on: March 18, 2011, 05:15:18 PM »
It's disgusting to see our politicians giving away our tax dollars to other countries!  They seem like they're more concerned about other countries' economy and employment than they are ours.
Logged

NightmarePatrol

  • Self Important Starfish
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 8514
Re: The middle east
« Reply #22 on: March 18, 2011, 05:45:40 PM »
Well it's not like they get 90 million in cash. It's my understanding that all the thing in the aid package are produced here. So it's not a total loss.

However, I agree with you. I guess it's the cost of spreading democracy.
Logged

Spicoli

  • Definately Not Leaving
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 160
Re: The middle east
« Reply #23 on: March 18, 2011, 06:53:25 PM »
Spreading democracy is a joke!
I have to wonder if the ulterior motive behind spreading democracy is simply to open up  markets for U.S. corporations.
Logged

Puffin

  • Self Important Starfish
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1943
Re: The middle east
« Reply #24 on: March 18, 2011, 09:44:19 PM »
Conflict is good for business.
 
Back in the 60's and early 70's there was a company Kellog, Brown and Root. (KBAR)
that built all the ports, runways, bridges etc in Vietnam, Thailand, Guam, Okinawa, and the Phillippines supporting the war. Anything that had to do with cement or steel, or construction.
 
That company is no longer called KBAR. It's now called.
.
.
.
Halliburton
 
Logged

Jayhawk

  • Won't Go Away
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 920
Re: The middle east
« Reply #25 on: March 19, 2011, 12:15:20 AM »
I guess it's the cost of spreading democracy.
What have our democracy-spreading efforts cost in vietnam, iraq and afghanistan among others, and how are those democracies workin' out?

the US has zero business getting involved in yet another quagmire in libya. If the neighboring countries want something done, let them do it and pay for it.
Logged

Amidala

  • Self Important Starfish
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 2854
Re: The middle east
« Reply #26 on: March 19, 2011, 12:19:17 AM »
The revolt in Egypt was spurred on by economic factors and facilitated by communication techonlogy. I don't see helping them as a bad thing; more like rewarding the people for seeking freedom. Not the same as our trying to create a democracy via an invasion, etc.
Logged

gore range

  • Self Important Starfish
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 3485
Re: The middle east
« Reply #27 on: March 19, 2011, 12:16:57 PM »
….cutting to the all-too-realistic bottom line-  democracy and the overwhelmingly most followers of  Islam in the Arabic/Persian world are diametrically opposed, and quite unsustainable in contemporary coexistence ….

….by no stretch of the imagination, the  ‘modern’ Arabic/Persian world is struggling to exist and  pro-create  per the social mores of centuries past while the bulk of the modern world has passed them by….

….”the west” can wish/desire all it wants regarding the sowing of democratic seeds in the overwhelming majority of the middle east, but as sad and cruel as it is, .....

....as if the all-too-real cherry-picking of which non-democratic regimes  we choose to support overlooking their suppression/killing of protesting democracy-desiring civilians, and those non-democratic regimes we we choose to go after isn't sad and cruel enough.......

....until there is some serious internal bloodshed invested by those craving life under the principles of the open-minded democratic principles, democracy in the middle east will remain self-emulating oil on water for the foreseeable future….

….though, it is interesting  to reflect that now near 20 years ago noted military geo-strategist and author
Thomas P.M. Barnett pointed out that the bulk of the world’s developing terrorist activities and security threats would be emanating from what he titled  the “non-integrated gap” countries of the globe- a distinct geographic band of ‘left-behind’ countries circling the planet-



- to include all the anti-democratic Arabic/Persian countries  not-so-coincidentally located at the heart of the ‘gap‘….

….and the remainder of the countries outside ‘the gap’ are what he titles the “functional core” of the modern evolving and  progressing world….

…..conflict between the two, actually- conflict between the fundamental residents most entrenched in the past of the non-aligned gap and those living in the functional core of the rest of the evolving world, are and will remain inevitable until-

….the bulk of those  in the non-integrated gap rise to relative comparable levels of standards of modern living found in the functional core….

….Barnett noted one of the productive methods for the functioning core to ‘encourage’ those living in the non-aligned gap to move along on the socio-economic scale of progress ( and thereby avoid extremely costly intervening military actions), particularly those in entrenched areas of centuries-old fundamentalist domination was to-

….plant the seeds of modern personnel communications technology- 20 years ago it was personal PCs and  web, access,  now, the affordable-to-the-masses cell phones and the pocket-sized immediate-web-access personal hardware, to allow those living under the thumb of non-democratic suppression  the opportunity to see/desire/lust what they are missing  while remaining on the aged decrepit pier of the past …….as the rest of the democratic-grounded world sails off leaving them….
Logged

lifefeedsonlife

  • Self Important Starfish
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4330
Re: The middle east
« Reply #28 on: March 19, 2011, 01:31:49 PM »
Very interesting map . . . falls into the whole "Guns, Germs, and Steel" idea.
 
. . . next question . . . are pople really craving democracy, or do they just want more stuff?
Logged
For small creatures such as we, the vastness is bearable only through love. - Carl Sagan

lifefeedsonlife

  • Self Important Starfish
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4330
Re: The middle east
« Reply #29 on: March 19, 2011, 02:39:36 PM »
Well - the French are in a hot fight in Libya . . . they're drawing up their surrender papers as we speak . . . .
Logged
For small creatures such as we, the vastness is bearable only through love. - Carl Sagan
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4   Go Up
 

*
A random picture
Sorry, you need to be logged in to view the gallery
Portal Management Extension PortaMx™ v0.957 | PortaMx © 2008-2009 by PortaMx corp.